Having the proper safety equipment on you, your motorcycle, wearing protective clothing, and knowing the does and don’t (s) could save your life. We will focus on these and more throughout this series.

With excessive fuel cost and unemployment on the rise, more people are riding motorcycles. In 2000 almost three thousand people were killed riding two wheel motorized vehicles on road and off. In 2007 these numbers rose above five thousand. Weather was not a factor in 98% of these fatalities. Approximately two thirds of these accidents involved collision with another motorist, most usually a passenger vehicle. Most of these drivers never saw the motorcycle before the collision. A very high percent (98% in 2006) of these riders had little or no professional training. Being self taught, or learning from friends and family.

Protective biker clothing comes in textiles and leather. They not only protect your body from wind and rain, but also from bugs and debris that might fly up from the roadway. Most common protective clothing are jackets, chaps, pants, overalls, and vests. Some of these offer even more protection by padding them in critical areas such as: shoulders, elbows, backs and knees.

Motorcycle safety equipment can consist of (but is not limited to)

Motorcycle helmets-protects your head from serious injury in a fall or spill. Helmets should fit snugly. You should never purchase a used helmet, that might have been in a previous accident. Always try on a helmet with any accessories that you might add later, such as, goggles, full face shields, sunglasses, and communication devices.

Boots-should be heeled and slip resistant.

Crash Bars– can be attached to both the front and rear of your motorcycle. Crash bars may not only save your bike from damage, but can also help prevent gas spills in a lay down crash.



Source by Kenny Leach